Category Archives: social media

How to Optimize your Facebook Page in 3 Simple Steps

Buzzwords' Facebook page

By Nicholas Beeson, Marketing Associate at Buzzwords Manchester

To get the most out of a Facebook page, you need to gain members. In order to do this, some basic SEO skills can be applied. Optimizing your Facebook page will enable it to be found on both Facebook and the World Wide Web!

Believe it or not, Facebook pages are indexed by search engines and can even be viewed by those without a Facebook account. Facebook pages also have the potential to rank highly!

Ranking well on Facebook’s internal search is even more important, as those searching for your brand or business on Facebook know what they want and will be able to find it with ease!

3 simple steps
To begin optimizing your page so it ranks well on both organic and internal searches, follow these 3 simple steps:

1. What are you about?

The “About” box is one of the most undervalued elements of a Facebook page. The “About” box provides you with a platform to add keywords that can tell customers and search engines what your page is about! The box also allows you to add clickable links that can direct customers back to your company’s website or any other related sites.

2. The category you place yourself in is vital

When deciding on the category in which to place your page, be careful. The category affects what you can add to your info, and how much you can add! When completing the info section, use lots of key words and add links to all of your related sites including your company website, blog, LinkedIn and Twitter.

3. Choose an appropriate URL and page name

When choosing the page name, make sure it is related to your organisation and easily visible to those searching for you. Once you have gained 25 ‘likes’, create a unique URL that is memorable and related to your brand!

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Manchester United show red card to Facebook advertising

By Nicholas Beeson, Marketing Associate at Buzzwords Manchester 

In the space of a year, Manchester United have acquired more than 14 million “likes” on Facebook. This is a fantastic display of Manchester United’s clout as a brand and it would be expected that the club would take full advantage of Facebook as a marketing platform.

Yet Manchester United have come out this week stating that they will not be advertising on their Facebook page.  The club launched the page last July which was regarded by many as quite late. Maybe this late entry into social media was because Manchester United didn’t know how to approach social media marketing as a football club?

With Manchester United’s Facebook page acquiring 14 million likes in under a year, it would seem to be an obvious move to advertise on their page. This hasn’t happened and the club have decided to opt out of Facebook advertising as they feel it will stop the growth of the fan base.

United’s Head of Marketing, Jonathan Rigby, has been quoted as saying,

“”We don’t sell off Facebook and are resisting until we are satisfied it will not mess up the growth of the Facebook page. Our big concern is that if we get it wrong then the fan base will stop growing.”

This fear that advertising may stunt the growth of Manchester United’s Facebook page is understandable, but what benefits could Facebook advertising bring to the club? Obviously Manchester United advertise, but unlike conventional advertising, Facebook ads can target and segment markets depending on the information on users’ profiles.

This segmentation could be used in countries where Manchester United are looking at the potential for growth, such as the US, India (where Facebook already has 40 million fans) and China. Facebook ads can provide all businesses (regardless of size) with the potential to target specific audiences – and it can be done efficiently and cost-effectively.

Manchester United also refuse to embrace other social media platforms, such as Twitter. The club have stated that they don’t feel there is a “role for Twitter”. With recent reports in the tabloids relating to Manchester United players and their use of Twitter, it is understandable why the club are cautious to have a Twitter platform.

Manchester United’s scepticism about the effectiveness of social media is hardly surprising. And it’s clear why they want to keep their Facebook page “for the fans”. It’s an admirable decision and, speaking as a United fan, I feel the Facebook page should be about the club – and not the profits.

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Marketing 101 – Social Media Marketing

Written by Nicholas Beeson – Marketing Associate at Buzzwords Manchester

Social media has changed the way we interact with our friends, family, customers and colleagues. It has enabled consumers to become opinion leaders, leaving marketers only one option: to listen to their customers’ opinions.

Social media can be explained as, “The sum total of people who create content online, as well as the people who interact with one another.”

Through social media, consumers are now able to add their own opinions and content to sites. This has enabled them to form opinions between one another on social networking sites, blogs and forums. As a result, marketers have developed Social Media Marketing (SMM) which can best be described as;

‘A term used to encompass any online marketing strategy or tactic which uses social media as the medium for its communication. Further use of social media is where the marketer engages in discourse with members of the general public (potential customers) in virtual communities.’

Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter are at the forefront of social media sites and, as the world knows, they are growing exponentially. Expert Larry Webster states that social networks are “Member-based communities that enable users to link one another based on common interests and through invites”.

Sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter all provide users with different experiences. Ultimately, however, they all give users the ability to find and connect with friends, family, colleagues etc. Social networking sites enable marketers to advertise, improve online exposure/reputation and nurture pre-existing brand advocates. Although the security and privacy that these sites provide is often questioned, they continue to grow and influence modern society.

As an example: when a US blogger called Vincent Ferrari felt that he had been insulted by an AOL customer service representative, he decided to take revenge. Ferrari posted the audio recording of the conversation online. As word spread, 300,000 listeners requested downloads of the audio file, the story was picked up by thousands of other bloggers and websites, and eventually made national news. This is a great example of the power blogs have and the true freedom consumers now have to vent their frustrations and offer opinions.

Businesses are also using blogs to add a human connection to a previously bland corporate image. Marketers have realised the importance of blogs as they can create massive exposure and also engage consumers on a personal level. Micro-blogging site, Twitter, gives business the opportunity to put out short 140-character blogs that can be just as effective as conventional blogs in moulding and influencing public opinion.

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Marketing 101 – Online PR and Reputation Management

By Nicholas Beeson, Marketing Associate at Buzzwords Manchester

PR is one of the most important elements of the marketing mix. It’s all about building positive relations with your company’s customers through publicity that builds a positive image around the company.

PR is even more important online. On the negative side, rumours and stories about companies can spread like wild-fire, damaging reputations and credibility in double-quick time. On the positive side, customer feedback can be invaluable in gaining an understanding of what the market is really thinking about your company, its products and services.

Internet marketing author and blogger Dave Chaffey gives a good description of Online PR: “Online PR is about maximising favourable mentions of your company, brands, products or web sites on third-party websites which are likely to be visited by your target audience. Online PR can also be used to support viral or word-of-mouth marketing activities in other media.”

Overall, Online PR boils down to two key things: raising the online profile of a business and managing the online reputation of a business.

Although the Internet has allowed companies to monitor and influence online conversations, it can also present them with a new set of problems. In particular, the complete freedom of speech that is possible online has worked against many companies.

The Internet is to a large extent uncontrolled. In principle, anyone can say or show anything. Much of the material that reaches the public no longer passes through traditional gatekeepers such as newspaper editors, radio or television producers. The result is both freedom of speech and distribution of unreliable, unconfirmed and often untrue information. This can be a threat – but also an opportunity – for PR practitioners.

An example of this lawlessness on the Internet was seen with the recent BP oil disaster. The social media site “Twitter”, saw 1 million conversations about BP. Of these conversations, 59% were deemed to be negative towards BP. This absolute freedom of speech can be damaging to companies, which further underlines the importance of Online PR and having a fall-back strategy in place. Communicating with online communities and PR ‘publics’ is vital as it raises the company profile as well as maintaining the reputation of the company or brand.

Social media is of course at the heart of the Online PR frenzy. Blogging and online news releases are other inter-related techniques used by companies to promote themselves online. The Digibuzz blog talks about the importance of online press releases;

In a significant report, titled ‘Search Marketing Benchmark Guide’, MarketingSherpa reported that online press releases, combined with organic search engine optimization, are among the most effective Internet marketing strategies.”

In its aims and effects, Online PR is not hugely different to offline PR. The principles are the same but the channels are different. Nowadays, Online PR and reputation management are a crucial part of any digital marketing plan. Online conversations constantly need to be monitored to pre-empt any negative feedback. Whilst Online PR raises a company’s profile, wherever possible it also needs to be carefully managed to protect the online image and reputation of a company.

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Who’s Driving the Social Media Bandwaggon?

The slightly opportunist stance of GolinHarris in announcing its new, flatter agency structure shouldn’t obscure the fact that PR and marketing services are undergoing a major sea-change at the hands of social media and the ongoing online revolution.

Who cares how a PR agency organises itself?  Even its clients shouldn’t be too concerned – providing the end result is a better service.  We can only assume that something along those lines was behind the GH announcement! 

Of course, revolutions spark some big changes.  Some would argue that it’s inevitable PR agencies will wrestle with their own internal response to the rise of social media, and everything else that goes with consumers and clients grabbing the marketing initiative.

Others would say that, ultimately, agencies will have no choice but to respond in the most optimal ways available.  Juggling with staffing structures, departmental responsibilities and individual skillsets is something that any responsible and responsive service sector consultancy will do (or should do) as a matter of course.

In the PR industry, change has never been as dramatic or as sustained as it has been over recent years.  With change comes opportunity, especially for the fleet of foot.  It could be argued that publicly announcing just how ‘fleet’ you really are is a shrewd new-business move calculated to attract clients who may feel they’re on the receiving end of some serious inertia as far as their existing agency is concerned!

Being seen to be pro-active will always contribute to PR success.  Responding to the ways clients and markets can be reached by co-ordinating social and digital media with ‘traditional’ PR skills is a sensible route to take when your competitors may be struggling to understand what is happening in their hitherto stable world.

And yet, making changes in response to market needs by shifting accountability, job labels or responsibilities may be too premature when the full implications of ultra-new media are still throbbing their way through every marketing channel. 

Whilst it’s probably better that even an embryonic response is better than no response to the demands of market complexity in an ever-shrinking global village, there’s a danger that the diversity of recent reaction among some of the bigger PR agencies will, in the end, be self-defeating.

 
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Buzzwords PR info now on Facebook

There’s more about Mike Beeson and Buzzwords’ PR services on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mike.beeson1

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Buzzwords embraces Twitter and PR 2.0

Follow Buzzwords’  Twitter updates on

twitter.com/COPYWRITINGBUZZ

(See sidebar for Buzzwords’ latest ‘tweets’ and to visit the site!!!)

 

Social media is coming of age and companies like Buzzwords need to know and see what’s going on in the PR 2.0 world, from both a B2B and consumer marketing perspective.

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